Database as a Service (DBaaS) may sound like a service business, but really its just another specialized Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). The CTO Vision article on DBaaS talks about hosting a database management system, but not hosting the application itself. Specifically, the author states “I believe that the reason for the draw is that databases, while critical to your applications, are generally a bit difficult to configure, scale and operate correctly. When presented with the opportunity to off-load that work to a provider, developers jump at the chance.” Developers seek help with databases because they were taught little in school about them and their experience becomes clouded by the many misperceptions about relational databases best described by Fabian Pascal. A good starter article is “Data Management’s Misconceptions” by Joab Jackson.

A software application that relies on mash-ups of packaged products without professional services to clarify and organize the meaning of data is, well, meaning-LESS. Database management systems and programming languages cannot, by themselves, provide the meaning, integrity, and consistency that gives an application purpose and usefulness. Some ONE needs to be facilitating the discussion of what functionality is needed, and to clarify what the nouns and verbs used to describe a business process mean. Without this clarity of purpose, any software application will eventually be doomed.

Konduit.com combines the professional services needed with a process framework that accelerates the iterative cycle of process adaptation to empower young businesses with a virtual “IT Department” where none exists. This service is delivered over an encrypted connection on the Internet, requires little upfront cost, no contracts, and a predictable recurring monthly fee structured to reflect the complexity of the application delivered.

The term “database” is filled with mystery, but in reality it’s just about communication and logical organization, something every business needs in order to thrive. The more organized your business information is, the greater chance you will have to settle misunderstandings with your customers and vendors. If you can audit the history of data changes, you can identify and remedy mistakes and know who needs more training.  Database management systems provide a critical part of what is needed.  Information technology is more than hardware and software as commodities. Information technology requires people who understand your business and can rapidly adapt your software-based process automations to changes in the marketplace or operations.  To be effective, a software developer must understand how to use a database management system in the context of a business process automation application.

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